Banksy in Ukraine: Instagram video shows his works – culture

British street artist Banksy posted a video on Instagram showing a number of graffiti works in Ukraine. Posting on his Instagram channel usually means that he acknowledges his authorship of those works. So far, Banksy had only acknowledged one of the images. He still veils his identity to this day.

The images shown were almost all sprayed on the walls of bombed buildings, some of which were discovered days ago and circulated on social media. The video that has now been released is a kind of making-of. First someone is shown cutting out stencils and spraying, then their images are shown:

Banksy video: A woman with a dog walks past Banksy graffiti in the village of Horenka near Kyiv.

A woman with a dog walks past Banksy graffiti in the village of Horenka near Kyiv.

(Photo: Genya Savilov/AFP)

An old man sitting in a bathtub scrubbing his back in a ruined house in the village of Horenka. A woman with hair rollers, a gas mask and a fire extinguisher on the facade of a burned-out house. Children teetering on a tank barrier. One motif shows a military truck whose gun looks like a penis smeared in the school toilet. The truck is emblazoned with the letter Z, which has become the Russian symbol of aggressive war. At the end of the video, a bald man looks at the rocket launcher and says, “I’ll kick out all his teeth and break his legs for this.” It remains unclear who the man is or who shot the video. A version of the Ukrainian song “Chervona Ruta” is laid over the whole thing. At the end, a lettering slides into the picture with the words: “In solidarity with the people of Ukraine”.

Banksy video: A Russian military vehicle with the letter Z carries a penis instead of a missile.

A Russian military vehicle with the letter Z carries a penis instead of a missile.

(Photo: Oleksii Chumachenko/Imago/Zuma Wire)

Banksy had previously traveled to crisis areas, including the West Bank. On Instagram, some users are now trying in their comments to point out another conflict to the artist. One writes: “Hey Banksy. Have you heard about Iran?!”

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